Advice From A Tree

by Ilan Shamir

Dear Friend,

Stand tall and proud.

Sink your roots deeply into the Earth.

Reflect the light of a greater source.

Think long term.

Go out on a limb.

Remember your place among all living beings.

Embrace with joy the changing seasons

for each yields its own abundance.

The energy and birth of Spring.

The growth and contentment of Summer.

The wisdom to let go of leaves in the Fall.

The rest and quiet renewal of Winter.

Feel the wind and the sun

and delight in their presence.

Look up at the moon that shines down upon you

and the mystery of the stars at night.

Seek nourishment from the good things in life.

Simple pleasures

Earth, fresh air, light

Be content with your natural beauty.

Drink plenty of water.

Let your limbs sway and dance in the breezes.

Be flexible.

Remember your roots.

Enjoy the view!

What is Your Dharma?

There are many interpretations of the meaning of the word, Dharma. For this purpose, we’ll call it truth. What do you hear when your thoughts become silent? What visions do you see? Have you come to the full realization of your true gifts?

We all have these labels: Mother, Father, Daughter, Son, Wife, Husband…but what is left when these labels fade away? What IS your true essence? Your destiny. You may be searching. But the answer isn’t very far away. Just listen.

It’s possible I was born a yogi. Or, maybe it was a past life? When I was about 12 years old, I wrote this poem. Questioning, seeking…

Am I Really Here?

A figment of reality.

A belief within the mind.

A true to life suggestion,

that truth is really blind.

A plan of people living,

a sight that isn’t seen.

My life I see before me.

Am I really here?

Sunday Deep – Sharing some profound quotes from Pema Chodron:

1. “Learning how to fail will help us more than anything else in life.”

2. “Protecting ourselves from pain—our own and that of others—has never worked. Everybody wants to be free from their suffering, but the majority of us go about it in ways that only make things worse.”

3. “When our main goals are to gain comfort and avoid discomfort, we begin to feel disconnected from, and even threatened by, others. We enclose ourselves in a mesh of fear.”

4. “Some people work hard, day and night, in the field of helping others, but their strongest motivation is to stay busy so they can avoid feeling their own pain.”

5. “It’s said that if we want to learn about our past, we should look at our present circumstances, for they are the result of our past actions. If we want to learn about our future, we should look at what we’re doing now.”

6. Though we can’t predict or control what will come up next or how we will feel about it, we can do something about how we react. We can work on how we relate to whatever comes up.”

7. Every time we catch ourselves going down the rut of a habitual reaction, we have a chance to interrupt the momentum and discover a whole new direction and depth to our life.”

8. “To the degree that we can open to our own discomfort, we can open to others’ as well, and vice versa. This is so because in reality there’s no difference between our pain and that of others.”

9. “When you become conscious, the first thing you discover is why you stayed unconscious all those years. Being conscious means you really have to feel what you feel, which is frequently very vulnerable and raw.”

10. “The interesting thing is that the more willing you are to step out of your comfort zone, the more comfortable you feel in your life. Situations that used to arouse fear and nausea become easier to relax.”

11. Accepting something, by the way, isn’t the same as liking it. To accept a feeling that we habitually associate with discomfort doesn’t mean we immediately turn around and start enjoying it. It means being okay with it as part of the texture of human life.”

Mindful Moment – Lean In

This is one of my favorites by Pema Chodron…

“In life we think that the point is to pass the test or overcome the problem. The real truth is that things don’t really get solved. They come together for a time, then they fall back apart. Then they come together and fall apart again. It’s just like that.

Personal discovery and growth come from letting there be room for all this to happen: room for grief, for relief, for misery, for joy.

Suffering comes from wishing things were different. Misery is self-inflicted, when we are expecting the “idea” to overcome the “actual,” or needing things (or people, or places) to be different for us so we can then be happy.

Let the hard things in life break you. Let them effect you. Let them change you. Let those hard moments inform you. Let this pain be your teacher. The experiences of your life are trying to tell you something about yourself. Don’t cop out on that. Don’t run away and hide under your covers. Lean in to it.

What is the lesson in the wind? What is the storm trying to tell you? What will you learn if you face it with courage? With full honesty and – lean in to it.”