A Brand New Offering

Demystifying Meditation – A New Mini Series (Virtual)

The benefits of meditation (physically and psychologically) are endless. In this new offering, you will:

Stretch, Breathe, and Meditate in order to calm the nervous system and balance the body/mind. Students will also experience a Short Teaching/Sharing. All practices in this series are instructor led with written teachings to take away and use in your own meditation practice. This class can be experienced seated in a chair and standing for movement. You don’t need to be on the floor.

The short teaching/sharing portion will include:

-More about what meditation is and is not
-Some of the misconceptions about meditation
-The benefits of meditation
-Self guided meditation techniques
– Instructor and non-instructor guided meditation techniques


Thursday’s 4:00-5:00 p.m. beginning 5/20 including (5/20, 5/27, 6/3). Series Cost: $30 ($10/class). Drop in to any individual class for $15, drop ins welcome. Please note that if you need to miss a class, you can request a complimentary copy of the class recording so you don’t ever have to miss class!
For more information about class content, wellness information, background, registrations, Q&A’s and to add a friend or relative to the email list (in the registration section), please visit: http://www.feelthepeaceblog.lynsirota.com

Issues in our Tissues

We all have issues in our tissues. It’s where our life story is housed (happiness, sadness, scars, trauma, blockages, etc.). Our tissue is our connective tissue and that’s a broad term that means our fascia, tendons, ligaments, bones, and even blood.

What’s really interesting about our tissue is that it both separates AND binds together muscles, organs, and other tissues of the body. It’s made up of ground substance, elastin, fibroblast cells, collagen, and more. And our fascial system (also called the interstitium) is now classified as its own organ. The interstitium is the source of lymph fluid. So when we move and stretch, we’re moving lymph which makes for a healthy immune system.

Have you stretched your tissues today? In yoga we move our tissues in all directions for optimal health. Come practice and feel the peace!

A Mindful Launch

I was recently asked about the best yoga poses to start the day. It got my engines revving! What’s a good way to launch into the world we live in? After giving this a bit of thought, here are my recommendations:

In Bed:

1. After waking up I love 9 very slow and very deep yogic breaths. In my yoga therapy program it was 36 breaths, but that is throughout the day, so you could insert 4 more sets of these breaths into your day and do the 9 at the very top of your day. This is very effective for helping to quell anxiety and promote wellness.


2. On your belly in bed, practice a few 1/2 circles with your ankles. Tops of the feet on the mattress, shift both big toes in toward each other and then shift them away from each other to your range of motion. Use the breath as it will enhance your range.


3. Press your shoulders into the mattress and release them while still on your belly. Inhale press, exhale release.


4. Bring your hands next to your chest, spread your fingers, forehead is on your mattress, inhale and lift the head, neck, and chest coming into Bhujangasana (Cobra). After a few rounds you may want to push in a little deeper and raise up higher coming into a raised cobra.


5. With your hands next to your chest, press down and lift your body up, widen your knees and bring your big toes toward each other and sit your bum back toward your ankles into Balasana (Child’s Pose). While enjoying this, wiggle your fingers and maybe circle your wrists. You can also do the same movement with your hands as you did with your ankles by shifting side to side into your wrist joint.


6. Make your way to your back, bend and widen your knees, soles of the feet on the mattress and windshield wiper your knees from side to side moving comfortably and in your range of motion within your hip sockets.

Edge of Bed:


7. Sit on the edge of your bed. Point and flex the feet. Spread and splay the toes. Fold the toes in and out (toward the soles of the feet).


8. If your feet reach the floor (depends on how high the bed is), do the pumping movement with the feet rocking from heel to toe on both feet. Sends blood, oxygen, lymph to upper parts of the body as the “circulatory system below.”


9. Extend each lower leg out and in – this lubricates the knees with synovial fluid and stretches the calves.


10. Bring hands to tops of thighs and do a few seated cow/cat movements for the spine. Inhale cow (belly and belly button moving out) and exhale to cat (rounded back and belly button moving in and back toward the spine).


11. Lower right ear to right shoulder relaxing both shoulders and breathe, close eyes, and soften for a count of 30 or for however long you have time for. Slowly come back up and repeat on the other side. Look over your right shoulder, inhale center, and look over left shoulder.


Slowly make your way to standing to launch yourself into a spectacular day!


*Feel free to print this. Keep it next to your bed and follow along!*

Mindful Moment

“Too many of us move through our lives with our true selves

buried below layers of repressed emotion. With so much

energy channeled toward sustaining the repression,

there is little left over for the deeper questions.

The consequences of our evasion are profound.

Our stockpiles toxify into a cache of weapons

that turn inward against the self:

quick fix, long suffering.

As Rumi said, “Most people guard against the fire,

and so end up in it.”

This is the power of then. If we don’t deal with our stuff,

it deals with us.”

― Jeff Brown, Soulshaping: A Journey Of Self Creation

Effort versus ease

By Guest Blogger: Eva Montalvo

Sthira Sukham Asanam

We may think that ease (sukha) is better than effort, because it just sounds so, well EASY.  Yet without effort (sthira) there is no strength or stability.  On the other hand, we can overdo effort and feel as if we are straining and stressed.

In yoga we come into poses (asanam) that may be relaxing, and others that feel more strenuous.  Practicing Sthira and Sukha really isn’t an either/or, though.  It is balancing both at the same time

For example, even in a relaxing stretch like child’s pose we can find a steadiness in our breathing and thoughts.  In a stronger pose such as Warrior II, even while feeling the effort of the body’s muscles used to hold the pose, we can still look for a lightness and comfort by letting the shoulders relax down away from the ears and softening the muscles of the face.

Often, we can find ease or contentment simply by letting go of expectations – what we think “should” be – and simply acknowledging what IS.  We can feel the pose and use the breath as a guide to that sweet spot of harmony within.

As you step off your mat and into your life, can you find this same balance of effort and ease?  For example, even while performing a task such as preparing dinner, I find a sense of ease by putting on my favorite music and reflecting on the day with gratitude.  

More about our guest blogger:

Eva is the Owner/Founder of Nourish Yoga & Wellness. Her mission is to inspire adults to live more energetically and vibrantly by helping them incorporate simple changes in their lifestyle, especially in learning how to move and breathe to connect to their body through yoga. She believes strongly in making yoga available for EVERY BODY and specializes in working with beginners and older adults. To learn more click here: https://www.nourishyogawellness.com/

Should?

Just because you CAN do something, does it mean you should? I recently realized while practicing yoga, after years of thinking I can’t do Camel Pose (Ustrasana), I actually can. Imagine that! I felt accomplished, proud of myself. All from a discovery that if I widened the space between my knees, I’m able to bend back just a bit deeper and take hold of my ankles. Prior to this discovery, I’d been priming my back with other poses which created some space. So I was ready at that time for this epiphany.

Fast forward about 2-3 weeks and I decide to teach it in class. First I demonstrate the gentle version of it, which I really like. And then for those who want to try a fuller expression, I demonstrate. The next day, I noticed sensation in my mid-back. The only explanation is that I should have stayed with the gentle version knowing that when I teach, I have a harder time being mindful of myself, because I’m focused on students. I did not, in that moment, have the ability to discern my best course of action. The Sanskrit for the concept of discernment is Vivek. I’d been learning about Vivek in a weekly class through the Princeton University Hindu Life Program. I had discovered the perfect lesson in Vivek (the hard way).

How can we take this lesson into our every day lives? Discerning how much we want to take in. One more news segment? One more Netflix series? Reaching, striving. One more commitment on the calendar? Should? Should not? Pause, breathe, think, weigh, assess…

Read more here about Camel Pose: https://www.yogajournal.com/poses/camel-pose

Pause

I don’t know about you, but speaking candidly, I’m having a hard time staying focused these days. Starting, stopping, starting again, maybe finishing, maybe not. I’ve accepted that this is my current state of mind. What I do find helpful in the midst of moving, but not actually going anywhere, is taking time to pause. Pausing to look at how beautiful the clouds are especially against the bright blue sky, pausing to feel the sun on my face, pausing to inhale the outdoor scents of blooming trees, bushes, and flowers, pausing to notice patterns in the stone tile in my house I’ve never noticed before and taking time to just be in that moment.

Each day I think about all the things in my life I am grateful for. I try not to focus on what I don’t have, but turn toward the abundance that I do have. What do you notice when you pause?

#thistooshallpass

Toning Your Immune System

During this season of awareness of our immune systems, there are practices and suggestions quite helpful for keeping the immune system toned. Sharing some of the many:

1. Reduce and regulate your exposure to stress. Stress affects the entire body and weakens the immune system as well as the digestive system. This involves the way you process stressful events in life as well.

2. Evaluate your lifestyle. Eat and sleep well. Focus on foods that are anti-inflammatory. Manage time and don’t over book or over burden your life. Being well rested helps your immune system fight and repair. It also helps the liver do its job detoxifying. Check out the Love your Liver Workshop coming up in April at this link: http://feelthepeaceblog.lynsirota.com/about/

3. Keep hands clean and away from the face. Sanitizing is good, but it is possible to overdo this. We need good bacteria too.

4. There are many foods, spices, herbs, and supplements that help the immune system. One of my personal favorites is Black Elderberry Extract. You can find it in stores under the name Sambucus and online. Try looking for a brand that is organic with little to no sugar.

4. Stay tuned in to your body and what it needs. Cultivate balance in the body and in life by staying deeply connected through physical movement especially yoga. Balance the body/mind through meditation.

Always check with your medical professional if you are concerned about your immunity or if you are thinking of trying new herbs and/or supplements to ensure no contraindications.

Sunday Deep – Sharing some profound quotes from Pema Chodron:

1. “Learning how to fail will help us more than anything else in life.”

2. “Protecting ourselves from pain—our own and that of others—has never worked. Everybody wants to be free from their suffering, but the majority of us go about it in ways that only make things worse.”

3. “When our main goals are to gain comfort and avoid discomfort, we begin to feel disconnected from, and even threatened by, others. We enclose ourselves in a mesh of fear.”

4. “Some people work hard, day and night, in the field of helping others, but their strongest motivation is to stay busy so they can avoid feeling their own pain.”

5. “It’s said that if we want to learn about our past, we should look at our present circumstances, for they are the result of our past actions. If we want to learn about our future, we should look at what we’re doing now.”

6. Though we can’t predict or control what will come up next or how we will feel about it, we can do something about how we react. We can work on how we relate to whatever comes up.”

7. Every time we catch ourselves going down the rut of a habitual reaction, we have a chance to interrupt the momentum and discover a whole new direction and depth to our life.”

8. “To the degree that we can open to our own discomfort, we can open to others’ as well, and vice versa. This is so because in reality there’s no difference between our pain and that of others.”

9. “When you become conscious, the first thing you discover is why you stayed unconscious all those years. Being conscious means you really have to feel what you feel, which is frequently very vulnerable and raw.”

10. “The interesting thing is that the more willing you are to step out of your comfort zone, the more comfortable you feel in your life. Situations that used to arouse fear and nausea become easier to relax.”

11. Accepting something, by the way, isn’t the same as liking it. To accept a feeling that we habitually associate with discomfort doesn’t mean we immediately turn around and start enjoying it. It means being okay with it as part of the texture of human life.”