Issues in our Tissues

We all have issues in our tissues. It’s where our life story is housed (happiness, sadness, scars, trauma, blockages, etc.). Our tissue is our connective tissue and that’s a broad term that means our fascia, tendons, ligaments, bones, and even blood.

What’s really interesting about our tissue is that it both separates AND binds together muscles, organs, and other tissues of the body. It’s made up of ground substance, elastin, fibroblast cells, collagen, and more. And our fascial system (also called the interstitium) is now classified as its own organ. The interstitium is the source of lymph fluid. So when we move and stretch, we’re moving lymph which makes for a healthy immune system.

Have you stretched your tissues today? In yoga we move our tissues in all directions for optimal health. Come practice and feel the peace!

Mushrooms for Health and Well-Being

Guest Post and photo by: Conny Jasper

Mushrooms are an amazing superfood packed with vital nutrients and healing benefits. They are a great source of antioxidants, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and other health promoting substances.

Many delicious and nutritious varieties include the shiitake, maitake, lion’s mane, oyster, and porcini. They are often available at most natural and gourmet food stores. However, there are hundreds of others that grow wild in the fields and forests. Naturally, it is necessary to properly identify wild mushrooms, and know exactly what they are, in order to avoid any problems.

Lion’s mane is one of the most interesting mushrooms with an array of health promoting properties. Much evidence based research has been conducted on this mushroom, and it has been shown to be beneficial for: mental health, boosting immunity, improving energy, and combatting inflammation.

Mushrooms should be thoroughly cooked and not eaten raw. Uncooked mushrooms can cause digestive upset. This is because they consist of a fiber called chitin. Cooking breaks down the fiber and makes it easier to digest. Some mushrooms cook within 30 minutes, while others can take as long as 90 minutes. It depends on the freshness and density of the mushroom. They are best cooked with light oil or organic butter. To fully enhance the flavor, add some white wine, vegetable broth, and a pinch of Himalayan pink salt. Bon appetit!

Conny Jasper is a holistic life coach, certified yoga instructor, certified Reiki Master, and certified massage therapist. She has a Master’s Degree in Counseling Psychology and helps people to heal and balance their body and mind. https://connyjasper8.wixsite.com/artist

Saffron For Health

By Guest Blogger: Rae Steinbach

Have you considered the health benefits of adding saffron to your diet?

A range of health benefits may flow from simply consuming natural ingredients. Consider saffron. Research shows it can boost health in numerous ways when taken as a saffron drink or ingested with food. Here’s more:

It helps protect the heart

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the U.S.  Saffron might help. This is because it reduces the stress on arteries and blood vessels. What this means is less risk of heart attack and similar cardiovascular health problems.

Managing anxiety

There’s evidence that saffron can improve mental and emotional health. Specifically, saffron has been shown to reduce anxiety to a degree. Its mood-boosting qualities also make it a powerful aphrodisiac for some. 

Improving immunity

Just as important as treating illnesses properly, is guarding against developing illnesses in the first place.

Saffron may help in this capacity: Research indicates it boosts the immune system. This makes colds, viruses, and similar illnesses less likely.

Adding saffron to the diet can be very beneficial for health and wellness.

Possible option if looking for a saffron drink

Please note: With the introduction of any new product, herb, or supplement, please consult with your healthcare professional before partaking, to ensure there aren’t any contraindications.

More about Rae Steinbach:

Rae is a graduate of Tufts University with a combined International Relations and Chinese degree. After spending time living and working abroad in China, she returned to NYC to pursue her career and continue curating quality content. Rae is passionate about travel, food, and writing. Twitter: @araesininthesun

Immunity Nutrients

By Guest Blogger – Nicole Printon

Our immune systems need to be fully functional at all times, particularly during a global pandemic.  Lifestyle habits are essential: regular exercise (active and passive, for balance), good sleep habits (regular bed time-before 10 pm for melatonin/cortisol ratios), and daily self care.  Good nutrition is key.

Incorporate these specific nutrients to boost immune function:

Vitamin A – plays a regulatory role in immune responses 
Foods rich in vitamin A: carrots, sweet potatoes, iceberg lettuce, king mackerel, salmon, goat cheese, cheddar cheese, hard boiled eggs

Vitamin C – a powerful antioxidant, squelching free radicals in the body that cause chronic inflammation.  Recent research suggests C protects against bacteria linked to ulcers and stomach cancer.  C supports cellular functions of both the innate and adaptive immune system
Foods Rich in Vitamin C: cantaloupe, bell peppers, broccoli, kiwi, tomatoes

Vitamin D – Research has shown that people with adequate D levels get sick less often.  For adequate amounts of Vitamin D, consuming foods rich in D is NOT enough.  Daily exposure to sunlight – sunscreen free; about 15 minutes daily is critical.
Foods rich in Vitamin D: salmon, sardines, egg yolk, shrimp, fortified milk (drink whole milk), yogurt (full fat)

Vitamin E – a powerful antioxidant, protects cell membranes from oxidation and combats free radicals in the body.  Supplementing Vitamin E is NOT necessary unless you have been diagnosed with a true deficiency.
Foods rich in Vitamin  E: spinach, almonds, sweet potatoes, pine nuts, brazil nuts, sunflower seeds, avocado, peanuts, butternut squash, olive oil, wheat germ

Zinc – critical for development and function of immune cells and accelerates wound healing.  Plays a critical role in collagen synthesis, immune function, and inflammatory response.  Zinc is an essential player in over 300 enzymatic reactions in the body.
Foods rich in Zinc: oysters, beef, oatmeal, mushrooms, chicken, hemp seeds, lentils, seeds, yogurt

Guest Blogger Nicole Printon holds certifications through WITs (personal training), ACE (Certified Health Coach with Behavior Change Specialty, and Group Fitness), and is currently pursuing a Master’s in Holistic Nutrition Therapy through Nutrition Therapy Institute.  She is completing her first 200 hour yoga teacher training mid May. She truly believes that fitness is the gateway to confidence, personal growth, and endless possibilities to live our most vibrant optimal lives. Nicole resides in Franklin Park with her 4 kids, 3 cats, and husband.

www.nicoleprinton.com